FarmPhoto.com - Photos. For farmers. By farmers.
T3RRA Cutta
Thread #218661 / / Total number of messages: 8 / Thread View Count: 518 / Add thread to favorites:
ChadG 218661 103 The Rest of my photos that did not post correctly either
The Rest of my photos that did not post correctly
This 1st is an 8010 full of grain headed for the semi at
Tensed Idaho.
0,0,0
Re: The Rest of my photos that did not post cor...
A photo of 1 of 4 8010 unloading into a bankout wagon near
Freeman WA
0,0,0
Re: The Rest of my photos that did not post cor...
Last picture from Freeman
0,0,0
Re: The Rest of my photos that did not post cor...
Last Picture of an 8010, 2388 and 6602 all cutting together
finishing a field near Plummer, Idaho. Sorry for all of the
psosting problems :-[
0,0,0
Re: The Rest of my photos that did not post cor...
Hi Chad!
nice pics and wonderful combine. I'm a fan of axial flow
machine and in Italy i haven't still seen a CaseIH AFX 8010
on the field. So a question for you: there are many
differences of performances between a 2388 and a 8010?
Greetings from Italy.
Sandro Zampieri
0,0,0
Re: The Rest of my photos that did not post cor...
Sandro-
Thanks for the compliment and you have some nice
picture s of the 2388. To answer some of the questions
about the 8010 it is about 1/3 again bigger than a 2388 in
just about every aspect. It has a 440 horsepowered motor
and 330 bu grain tank. It also has a larger cleaning area
however has the same rotor as a 2388. The machines around
here have 36 ft flexible draper headers when they cut
grains. When the cut with a 2388 most people will fill up
the 210 bu tank of a 2388 in the same time they can fill up
the 330 of the 8010, so they are very impressive machines.
Some of the picture are from a large farmer in the area who
runs 4 of the 8010's. They have about 12,000 acres and
5,000 acres of it is a crop called bluegrass and they need
that much capacity to harvest that much in a timely manner.
If they were just farming this ground as grain crops they
could use less combine power. Thanks for your inquiry and
hope this helps! :-)
0,0,0
Re: The Rest of my photos that did not post cor...
Hi Chad,
thanks for your explications but in order to understand the
real performance on AFX 8010 i must translate bushel and
acres in litres and hectars. So grain tank of AFX can
contain about 12.000 litres of grain( 330 bu.) against the
7600 litres of 2388 ( as i tell me AFX is 1/3 bigger than
2388). But are you sure that the AFX rotor is the same that
2388 exclusive?
For the extension of the farm in which runs 4 8010's,
12.000 acres are about 4800 hectars( 1 hectar= 10.000
square meters)!! In Italy there are only few farm that have
this dimension, really in Italy there are only 1 or 2 AFX
8010. I have seen an AFX only one time, but not running, it
was the last november at the most important italian fair of
farm equipment: very impressive machine!!
I'm very interesting to know something else about bluegrass:
what the use of this crop? have you got a pic of it to send
me?
I dream a day to work in a very large american farm, where
there are no trees, holes, gates, and so on..
Thanks for your replies!
Sandro
0,0,0
Re: The Rest of my photos that did not post cor...
Sandro-
Thanks for your information. I am going to try and
answer each of your questions. The first is about the rotor
of the 8010. I am just a farm consultant that works with
these growers but i was told the rotor is exactly the same
diameter of a 2388 and is actually 4 inches shorter because
the rotor of an 8010 has a different drive mechanism than a
2388. However I am not sure about a 2388 exclusive. I am
not familiar with the "exclusive" designation, maybe you can
tell me the difference between a 2388 and a 2388 exclusive.
The next question you were inquiring about was the size of
the farm I was talking about. There are only a few of the
larger size (over 10,000 acres) where I am from. Most farms
are in the 2000 to 4000 acre range. The conversion I found
for hectares was this 1 acre = 0.40469 hectares. The last
question you asked about was bluegrass as a crop. Bluegrass
is a very limited crop here in eastern Washington and on the
scale of ag in the USA in not an important crop. It is
used for lawn seed for homeowners, parks, and golf courses.
It can be lucrative and with our other comodities not so
profitable it is why some people are planting it. It is a
very simple crop to raise as it does not get replanted once
it is established. It is costly to raise however and that
is one drawback. But after you establish the crop you
simply fertilize it in the fall, spray for weeds in the
spring, swath it around the 1st of July, and harvest it
about 2 weeks after that. I hope this helps answer some of
your questions. Here is a pictue of an 8010 harvesting
bluegrass in 2004. Thanks again :-)
0,0,0
Loading Message List
[You must sign in to add photos or messages to this thread]
.
Please Note: FarmPhoto.com does not claim ownership of the photos posted here.
Contact individual posters for permission before using any of the photos.
0.088sec