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TasCowboy 344710 84 Poppy Harvesters either
Poppy Harvesters
Poppy harvester harvesting poppies on raised beds.

Northern Midlands, Tasmania, January 1999.

Massey Ferguson 3650 Tractor with poppy harvester front &
bin.
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
A John Deere 9940 Cotton Harvester converted to harvest
poppies.

Longford, Tasmania, February 2000.

The cotton harvesting gear has been removed & placed with a
poppy front & chopper + the bin.
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
Another of the MF rig.

Harvesting poppies at Nile, Tasmania, February 1999.
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The MF rig again, another shot from the same paddock as the
previous photo,

Nile, Tasmania February 1999.
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
MF 8780 rotary combine harvester with 30ft (9 metre) draper
front.

Has been harvesting poppies in the foreground of the photo.

Cressy, Tasmania March 2000.
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
what kind of crop is this, and where do they use it for. do
you have a close up picture of it?
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
Check out my posting under field crops Rony, for more pics.

Poppies are used to manufacture pain relief medication from,
things like morphine, codeine & thebaine come from poppies
(things like Panadol, etc all come from codeine, which comes
from poppies).

The poppy seed that you see on bread rolls & hamburger buns
also comes from the poppy plant but there is no medicinal
value in the seed.

Hope this helps you :-)
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
verry intresting,
has the Massey a reverse seat and steering?
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Is the poppy harvester only a chopper or something like a
stripper? And how ever, they have to seperate seed and chaff
at home. Why they do it at home?

Why they are growing in beds? beside to avoid tractor tracks
I saw no reason??

Greetings from Bavaria
The vacation region of Germany
Best
Theo
theo
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
Is the poppy harvester only a chopper or something like a
stripper? And how ever, they have to seperate seed and chaff
at home. Why they do it at home?

Why they are growing in beds? beside to avoid tractor tracks
I saw no reason??

Greetings from Bavaria
The vacation region of Germany

Best
Theo
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Re: Poppy Harvesters
jdeere,

The Massey in question is easily converted for "driving
backwards". The steering wheel is removed from the normal
position & put onto a column at the rear. There is a
seperate dash at the rear also. The seat is just turned
around too.

There is obviously some other internal work that is done but
I never had anything to do with that side of the harvest
operation. As the gears on the Massey are the same forward
or backwards, it is an easy job to drive (just remembering
to put the lever into reverse then select your main gear).

Theo; the machine is a converted forage harvester. All of
the chopped straw & seed are blown into the trailing bin. It
is all transported to the processing factory, where the seed
& straw is then seperated.

The crops are grown on beds, as a preventative measure
against waterlogging. Not all of the crops are grown on
beds, just ones in paddocks (fields) susceptible to water
logging.

Cheers :-) from the island state of Australia, Tasmania.
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Interesting crop, i had never heard of it before. Thanks for the explanation.

A very important crop than ey;-) Does it pay good?
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Hi Rony,

At the moment the returns are down (due to world over
supply) but back a few seasons ago (when these pictures were
taken) growers were making some fantastic returns (as high
as $10000 / hectare gross income, alot of crops averaging
$3500 - $4000 / hectare gross income).

Net returns were quite good, as the crop isnt overly
expensive (compared to other vegetable crops grown such as
potatoes & onions) to grow. Main costs are chemicals (3-4
herbicides, 1 x insecticide & 3-4 fungicides), fertilizer,
irrigation & land preparation, averaging maybe $700 - $850 /
hectare total.

Bearing this in mind, a gross margin of $2500 - $2900 /
hectare is possible (or was when prices were good). I guess
it is like any other ag commodity, supply & demand driven &
cyclical in the way it returns income to the growers.

Weather is an important factor too; last season was
extremely wet & crops were generally poor, so returns were
down. This season has been extemely dry, so anyone with
plenty of water, who planted early, should be looking at
some reasonable yields (bearing in mind prices are still
low, so overall returns will still be down, especially as ag
chem, fertilizer & fuel prices are still high).

I hope this helps you out :-)

Craig.
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