FarmPhoto.com - Share your farming photos!
T3RRA Cutta
Thread #399410 / / Total number of messages: 18 / Thread View Count: 4145 / Add thread to favorites:
Nyhof Canada 399410 134 lm435a wrapping silage bales either
lm435a wrapping silage bales
Last season with our New Holland Telehandler wrapping bales with a Tube-Line wrapper.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
a different place, different time, probably in the evening. This is an older version of the same wrapper. We rented it off of a neighbour before we bought one ourselves.
The fork on the telehandler is used for stacking 3 or 4 medium sized square bales, but it works for round bales too. It is faster than using a grapple because you dont need to open it, just back away.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
The new model last year.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
close up.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
other side.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
how do you like the baler?
(genuine New Idea hard core)?
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Nyhof!

Intresting to see your wrapper. We have some of this type here in Sweden, not many, but I think of other brands.

How many layers of plastic do you put on? Are you satisfied with the system?
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Very nice pics Nyhof :-)

Lennart, tubeline wrappers are very popular here in my part of Tasmania (not this one in the pics but mainly seem to be the Webco / Webbline models, made in NZ). Saves alot of plastic too ;-)
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Nyhof: We used to use that machine as well, for about 2-3 years, with about 2,300 bales the first year alone. It was alright, we didn't know any better so couldn't compare it to anything. Then a few years ago we tried a different machine that the neighbor had, and liked it so much we bought one.

It's a bagging machine, vs a wrapper, not sure if you've ever tried the bags? There's no capping, none of this film frozen to the bales, peeling away in strips, the only downside is that you have to replace the bag every 40 bales (about a 10 minute job).

If you haven't already, I highly suggest you try it, even for a few bags from a custom guy.

AgTalk - Thread questioning me about various methods of silage.
FarmPhoto Thread - Pics from 2006 Silage

Nice pics, thanks for sharing.
-Josh
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
jdeere: The baler works awesome, it has tremendous capacity. It is actually a hesston baler with a new idea paint color. The baler runs only by the pto, the pto runs a hydraulic pump for the cylinders like the end gate, pickup and twine tubes. It is really nice because the baler will tie, let the bale out, and push the kicker out with not one touch of a button.
Lennart, we put 6 wraps of plastic on. The machine holds 4 rolls at once so it really only has to make 3 turns to get the layers on.
Josh: We have never used a bagger but we have a neighbor that has one. We didnt like the way it put the plastic on because it was not nearly tight enough. Like i said to lennart, the machine wraps from 4 rolls at once so we dont have to replace rolls very often.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
i can imagen how nice this is with a baler like that,how long are these models on the market?
when i first made rolls back in the 80's,all we had was a JD 510 with hydraulic twinepipe wich was controlled by lever from tractor and later a JD 535 with twinn pipes for twine.
PS.with those balers it was hard to start a bale in dry conditions,especally the 510. :-\
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Nyhof: I understand where you're coming from, I've heard a few guys make the same comments to us about that, however I think that's most likely due to operator error. One of the guys that I was working with this summer had a tendency to stretch the bag all the way out, then release it back down to the size of the bale once it was tied. Because of that, it never actually tightened back up all the way, and that bag even had wrinkles and bubbles in it etc. The bags that he did this to turned out less than prime, and was somewhat dry, with some mold on them. If done properly, you don't actually have to stretch it wider than the bale, the arms will actually feed and compress the bale to fit into the bag, then as the bale expands after leaving the confines of the bagger arms, it expands a few more cm and the result is it being very solid, very tight. Better to squeeze the bale into the plastic, than to stretch the plastic over the bale.

One other complaint I've heard is by a neighbor who I was bagging for was about how "This means I have to make my bales even and the same size." Perhaps I'm alone on this one, but I've personally always tended to like my bales to be the same shape and size...:-\

We've found the feed quality to be much higher with the new system when done properly, and for that reason I'm generally the one who handles everything to do with the bagging of the bales.

We've also found it to just be a much cleaner method when it comes to removing the bales from the bag during the winter, doesn't stick and tear like the wrap did.

I agree with you about the benefit of having the 4 rolls going at once, that was by far the best thing about that machine for the years we used it.

How do you like that A-Frame bale spear on the 435? I'm just wondering since I noticed that on the Fendt 714 you got the Square Bale Stacker instead. We've got the 75" Heavy Duty A-Frame for the 7630 as well, only ours has the 49" spears where-as yours only looks to have the 39" or probably 32" spears? Do you find they're wide enough for the bigger 6.5 foot hay and straw bales?

Thanks,
-Josh
Edit: I've attached a picture of the removing the bales from the plastic, you can clearly see how this bag was poorly installed, you can see the ripples in the plastic along the bottom due to it being over-stretched before the bale was inserted.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Josh: the spear on the telehandler is built for stacking 3 or 4 medium squares, we used it on our 8970. The fendt has the spear with the two tines to the outside of the fork, making it better to lift bales, this has the long tines and the other fork has the short tines. We like the short ones for wrapping because they pull out easier and dont jerk the machine back as the long ones do in the tight bales.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Nyhof, I didn't think about it, but it definitely makes sense to use the short spears for loading the bagger, for the very reason you mentioned.

About the squares... What did you use for a baler, and I imagine you used the 8970(s)? I haven't seen any of your pictures of them, do you still use them? If not, would you mind sharing why not? We're just tossing around some ideas about them, would like to start using them, especially for silage. We originally figured that 146 tons of feed in one bag is much nicer than 40 tons a bag, plus you can load them in 2 at a time using half as much space.

Now we're thinking of trying ASlomp's method, stacking them 84 bales per stack, one layer of black plastic, then two more identical stacks right next to it, then one layer of white plastic over the whole thing. Seems like it could work well if done right, we would essentially be bagging an entire stack.

We would continue to use the bale processors to feed, although the 8000 is the only one that would see the squares. Not sure how well this would work?

The downside to this is trying to find someone to hire it done as there are very few big square balers in the area, and as we would only use it for silage, we probably wouldn't put enough bales through it to justify purchasing a new one.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts, information, and opinions you have to share on the matter.
-Josh
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Josh: We never had a square baler, it was always custom done by a few different guys. We used them for dry hay in our tiestall dairy barn. We never did make any into silage. We are using completely rounds now because we are no milking in a parlor and have the cows outside year round. Getting dry hay seemed to be quite a struggle so we decided to go to silage bales, which is so much easier in round bales.
We have never tried the squares in our processor, but there is an option to get the hydraulic tub which would work better i think.
We will make some squares this year to feed our special needs/fresh cow barn. We push them in with the skid steer, and are alot easier to feed then a giant round bale.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Nyhof: We switched to the silage for the same reason, and the feed quality is just so much better if done right. Only one question, and that's why do you think the silage would be easier in rounds that in squares?

I do know of the hydraulic tub, however the bales will weigh so much as it is, plus we like our machine, so I'd rather just make the shorter bales. (3x4x6 or 4x4x6)

I've since talked to a custom guy in the area, looks like our silage will be made this year with two CaseIH 9330 and STX280 4wds toting around Hesston 4910 4x4 balers. It can be cut with either two of the big Hesston self propelled mowers, or a Krone Big M with 32' cutting width. Now I just need to convince him to bale at 45-55% moisture content.

For feeding by hand, I definitely prefer the large squares, like you said.
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
For us they are alot easier to handle. With squares i would imagine it would take longer to get them home and also wrap them up. I'm thinking in a 3x3 bale, but a 4x4 would probably weigh the same as a large round.
So i guess this year you wont need to do alot of field work over summer if you are getting it all done for you. How will you do the wrapping? In a stack like you said before or in a continuous tube?
0,0,0
Re: lm435a wrapping silage bales
Right, I forgot about you having the bale picker/wagon. For us, we just have a 53' deck for the semi so.... squares would actually be easier.

For us... No idea yet. On any of it. I was told that you can't make 4x4 silage bales because of the moisture level, can't feed enough product to the top of the bale, so you end up with trapezoid ( /__\ ) bales.
So the eliminates the one idea.... I stopped by at that one guy's place that runs the 4910s, and we came up with a new game-plan. He cuts, we bale, we handle, we haul, we bag.

So that means we need a baler. What make, what shape? No idea.
There's 3 brains in this operation, the one that makes the final decision is thinking round, a JD568, and the other two pawns are thinking Hesston 4790 3x4 square w/ accumulator.

One way or another, as a friend of mine called it, should be having some Demo Days by the end of June. There's 5 round baler brands to consider, and a few squares. And I don't want to buy anything without trying them all.

We were considering the stack for a while, but I don't think we'll do that this year. I want to go on a Slomp tour and actually see one in real life, and talk to him about it before we decide to trust 900 bales of silage under it without having ever seen it before.

Depending on whether or not aslomp is comfortable with that, (i've been so busy i haven't asked him yet:-[) and how we find that method, the other method we're considering for next year is a new bagging machine, that stacks them 2-3 bales high, and bags them same as ours. That's the last resort in my opinion however, as the bagging machine itself is close to $70,000 and there is no way for it to be traded/sold. There are only 7 in North America including 3 in Mexico and 1 in Canada. They are for the custom crews.

So for this year, I'm thinking we'll be using our current bagger, and either be putting through rounds, or 3x4s in lengthwise. Only time will tell, but it better speak up soon since time is running out, we'll be making silage in a month.

We had thought having it all done for us would be nice, the idea was that we'd be doing field work (as in tillage) this summer instead... but the current state of the pastures (underwater) tell me otherwise.
0,0,0
Loading Message List
[You must sign in to add photos or messages to this thread]
.
Please Note: FarmPhoto.com does not claim ownership of the photos posted here.
Contact individual posters for permission before using any of the photos.
0.118sec