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Deere Dingle 455787 13 Limestone Dry Stone Wall either
Limestone Dry Stone Wall
I did a bit of dry stone walling the other day. It is fiddly awkward stuff Limestone and this was no exception being very small cobbles. About 2 yards were down (2 metres-ish) so I managed to fire it up in about 3 hours. ;-)
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I also made a beam suitable to go over the window of a farmhouse today. The tool in the foreground is called a Draw Knife or Adse. This one is the English pattern version although there are two other types out there. This old beam was originally a roof timber in a loose box or stable by the look of it.:-)
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A closer look reveals the seasoned wood and also how the Adse has cleaned off the manky wood leaving a clean solid finish. If you look close enough you can see the shine I put on the beam with the Adse as I took shallower skims of wood off to leave a smooth finish.:-D
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Looks like you have been a busy boy JDD ;-)

I have read that dry stone walling is a dying art; what a shame, they look so nice but I bet it is hard work to do.
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Hi TC, Yes busy indeed. Not many people want to do the work because it is heavy manual labour where a machine has no real use other than digging out the footing's. And of course there is the weather to put up with. You either risk being burned alive if it is hot and sunny or frozen to the wall if comes in very cold. But usually you just get soaked to the skin in the rain:-\ Still, it pays a wage I suppose;-) Limestone is difficult to wall because of the irregular angular shapes and also because it cannot be worked to a shape like sand stone. This is because it is very brittle, some of the cobbles ring almost like a hammer striking another hammer! It is very difficult to make nice clean courses that look neat and tidy, it can be deeply frustrating stuff to work with:-\ Kind regards, JDD.
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Very interesting JDD.
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Yes, I agree Stu,

Thanks for the additional info JDD ;-)

Regards,

Tas Cowboy :-)
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Thanks chaps:-), you are both more than welcome. At some point in due course I will post a series of photos showing some of the stages and key stones of building dry stone walls if you think it may be of interest to the wider audience?:-)
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Sounds good ;-)
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JDD, I don't know about the rest but I'd be very interested in seeing more on stone wall construction (I come off a property where there is no shortage of this raw material! :-[ )....
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Ok gents, I have quite a bit of walling to do this week while the weather is good. So I will put together a series of photos and text to outline the basics. It may take me a day or two because I am out tomorrow night looking at some sandstone, dry stone walling that needs doing for another farmer in a different district. I will do another series for sandstone as the technique is different due to the differing types of stone;-) Kind regards, JDD.
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Sounds good JDD. There is only one stone wall that I have seen in Tasmania but like Stu, there is no shortage of material, here either (stone wise, whether they would be suited to walling I am not too sure),

Regards,

TC ;-)
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I am on with the task already. I will start to post the subject at weekend. I wonder why dry stone walls are not more widely used especially down under:-\ If it is possible to wall with Limestone, then I am sure what you have will be OK. If you sort out a return ticket and somewhere to eat and sleep I will bob down for a week or two and get you started;-)
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In my experience it is very rare to see dry stone walls in Australia. I would guess that this is a function of the historically extensive nature of Australian agriculture. Cheap land, large fields, and expensive labour probably all contribute to barbed wire being a more attractive fencing option.

That said, there definitely are dry stone wall enthusiasts here. ie see http://www.dswaa.org.au/ (Dry Stone Walls Association of Australia).
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