FarmPhoto.com - The global farm community.
T3RRA Cutta
Thread #8228 / / Total number of messages: 5 / Thread View Count: 1089 / Add thread to favorites:
Laapa 8228 72 Green Giant pea harvesters either
Green Giant pea harvesters
This picture was taken in 1997 in Blue Earth, Southern
Minnesota.

This line of pea harvesters belong to the Green Giant
company.

Can anyone tell the make and modell of them. Unfortunately i
never had the oportunity to watch them in action.
0,0,0
Re: Green Giant pea harvesters
these harvesters I belive where manufactured by Chisholm
Ryder.I think they are now made by Pic-Ryte. www.wwfcinc.com
0,0,0
Re: Green Giant pea harvesters
Be happy you never did see - hear them in action
0,0,0
Re: Green Giant pea harvesters
These viners are of Chisholm-Ryder. They are model 902's,
and were built in the early 80's. They are a bit primative
compared to the newest viners being built these days ie...
FMC's. But they have a very low maintnence cost per year
comparitively speaking and are easy to work on. We have
owned 32 of these viners since new and have over half of
them still up and vining as of 2003 harvest, along with 12
FMC 156's. For 2004 harvest we will still be using the C-R
902's even though they are about 20 years old. I predict
that 22 of the origional 32 Chism-Ryders will be ready to go
by the first day of pea harvest... with winter overhaul cost
to all of the 22 machines being much less than our 12 newer
machines. Did i hear the energizer bunny just go by?
Hehe.
0,0,0
Re: Green Giant pea harvesters
Johan Buregard wrote:
This picture was taken in 1997 in Blue Earth, Southern
Minnesota.

This line of pea harvesters belong to the Green Giant
company.

Can anyone tell the make and modell of them. Unfortunately i
never had the oportunity to watch them in action.


Thank you for posting this. I, and many others from the area, drove these viners for Green Giant in Blue Earth. It is the only picture online I can find of them online. They were loud and clunky, but simple, reliable, easy to clean at and service in the field. Some didn't come back to the shop for the whole season, just field to field to field.

It took practice to learn how "quick" (slow) the autoleveling reacted (only one rate) so you didn't bury the head, and God help you if you were in top gear and hit a swale at an angle, you could get pitched out the side if you had autolevel on.
0,0,0
Loading Message List
[You must sign in to add photos or messages to this thread]
.
Please Note: FarmPhoto.com does not claim ownership of the photos posted here.
Contact individual posters for permission before using any of the photos.
0.077sec